Washington Small Estate Affidavit | Affidavit of Heirship

Washington state allows heirs or other interested parties, including creditors with evidence of a decedent’s debts, to file either the affidavit of heirship or the small estate affidavit to claim bank accounts, trusts, final paychecks and other debts, vehicles, real estate, and other tangible or real estate property. The “small estate” must value $100,000 or less, and interested parties must wait at least 40 days before filing the affidavits. These affidavits allow loved ones to avoid the time and expense of probate court when there is no last will and testament, and allows creditors to retrieve their debts out of a deceased person’s estate before it is passed on to heirs.

Affidavit of Heirship: When 40 days have passed after a loved one dies, successors may file the affidavit of heirship in Washington state to claim personal and tangible property up to $100,000 in value.

Small Estate Affidavit: in Washington, no creditors may file the small estate affidavit or other affidavits unless they are government agencies, like the Department of Social Services.



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Interested parties, whether family members or creditors, may file the affidavit of heirship in Washington state to claim personal and tangible property, such as bank accounts and motor vehicles, and avoid probate court. The total value of this estate may not exceed $100,000, and any interested party must wait at…

Adobe PDF | Microsoft Word (.doc)

Per the Washington state heirship law, “successor” is defined as a family member or any other individual who can claim ownership of the real estate property of a deceased individual. This does not include creditors, except for state-run agencies like the Department of Social Services. These interested parties may file…